?

Log in

A discussion group for Retro Hugo eligible works by women creators

> Recent Entries
> Archive
> Friends
> Profile
> previous 10 entries

Links
MidAmeriCon II - 1941 Retro Hugos
SFE - Retro Hugo

September 12th, 2015


hatgirl
04:46 pm - About Retro Hugo Women [sticky post]
In August 2016, Worldcon: MidAmeriCon II will award the 1941 Retro Hugos for works published in 1940. Some items from 1940 are still in print and talked about today, such as the serial "Slan" by A. E. van Vogt. But many excellent works have fallen into obscurity... especially those created by women.

Retro Hugo Women is a discussion group for Retro Hugo-eligible works by women creators. Because how will we know what is worthy of nomination if we never read it in the first place?

An (incomplete) list of works by women creators that are eligible for the 1941 Retro HugosCollapse )

FAQsCollapse )

Have a question or a suggestion? Post here.


Tags:

 

December 5th, 2015


memphismaniac
12:12 pm - "Escort" by Daphne du Maurier
I recently read this short story that first appeared in The Saturday Evening Post in 1940. It's been called a ghost-ship story, but a case could probably be made for a Twilight Zoneish time travel story. The story involves a British steamer that is being pursued by a German U-boat, until a British sailing ship comes to their aid ... although there are no sailing ships on the British register during World War II.

I read it in the collection, Don't Look Now, but it has been anthologized several times, so it should be fairly easy to locate. Daphne du Maurier is definitely an author worthy of a posthumous Hugo.

Internet Speculative Fiction Database Entry for "Escort"

(Leave a comment)

September 15th, 2015


kyrademon
10:32 pm - Kallocain
I'd like to suggest the classic science fiction novel Kallocain, by Karin Boye. While not the most well-known work in the U.S., it's a giant of the genre often compared to Brave New World (and many think Kallocain is the better of the two), or to 1984. Kallocain was Boye's last work before her death at age 40. There appears to be a full English translation available on the web here:

http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/Literature/Literature-idx?id=Literature.BoyeKallocn

Here's a Wikipedia description: "Kallocain is a classic 1940 Swedish dystopian novel which envisions a future of drab terror. Seen through the eyes of idealistic scientist Leo Kall, Kallocain's depiction of a totalitarian world state may draw on what novelist Karin Boye observed or sensed about the early Nazi Germany of the 1930s. An important aspect of the novel is the relationships and connections between the various characters, such as the marriage of the main character and his wife Linda Kall, and the feelings of jealousy and suspicion that may arise in a society with heavy surveillance and legal uncertainty."

"One of its central ideas coincides with contemporary rumors of truth drugs that ensured the subordination of every citizen to the state. Both Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and Boye's Kallocain are drug dystopias, or societies in which pharmacology is used to suppress opposition to authority. However, unlike Brave New World, where a drug is used to suppress the urge to nonconformity generally, in Kallocain a drug is used to detect individual acts and thoughts of rebellion."

(Leave a comment)

hatgirl
06:17 pm - Is It Eligible? - 1941 Retro Hugos


Not sure if a work is eligible for this group? Post it in the comments and our crack team of investigators will try to find out.


(2 comments | Leave a comment)

September 12th, 2015


hatgirl
06:55 pm - "The Tapestry Gate" by Leigh Brackett (Short Story Discussion Thread - 1941 Retro Hugos)
"The Tapestry Gate" by Leigh Brackett was first published in "Strange Stories" (August 1940).

Links Of Interest

(3 comments | Leave a comment)

hatgirl
05:42 pm - "Song in a Minor Key" by C. L. Moore (Short Story Discussion Thread - 1941 Retro Hugos)
"Song in a Minor Key" by C. L. Moore was first published in the fanzine "Scienti-Snap" (Feb 1940).

Links Of Interest

(1 comment | Leave a comment)

hatgirl
04:51 pm - Margaret Brundage (Professional Artist Discussion Thread - 1941 Retro Hugos)
Margaret Brundage was the quintessential Weird Tales cover artist, creating 66 original-artwork covers for Weird Tales between 1932 and 1945. In 1940 she was the cover artist for 2 Weird Tales issues.

Links Of Interest

(1 comment | Leave a comment)

August 28th, 2014


hatgirl
11:04 pm - 1939 Retro Hugo Winners Announced
The winners of the 1939 Retro Hugos were announced at Loncon3, and two women would have taken home rockets!

Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form): The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. Written by Howard Koch & Anne Froelick, directed by Orson Welles (The Mercury Theater on the Air, CBS)
Best Fanzine: Imagination! edited by Forrest J Ackerman, Morojo, and T. Bruce Yerke

I watched the ceremony live at Loncon3, in a very sparkly frock, and had a fantastic time. You can view a video of the awards ceremony here.
Tags:

(Leave a comment)

April 22nd, 2014


hatgirl
08:28 pm - 1939 Retro Hugo Nominees Announced
The 1939 Retro Hugo Nominees have been announced, and the full list of finalists can be read here.

A few women did make the ballot!
Best Novella: Anthem by Ayn Rand (Cassell)
Best Novelette: “Werewoman” by C. L. Moore (Leaves #2, Winter 1938)
Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form): The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. Written by Howard Koch & Anne Froelick, directed by Orson Welles (The Mercury Theater on the Air, CBS)
Best Professional Artist: Margaret Brundage
Best Fanzine: Imagination! edited by Forrest J Ackerman, Morojo, and T. Bruce Yerke

I have checked with Sasquan, and they shan't be hosting the 1940 Retro Hugos. Many thanks to everyone who helped with this project, and I hope you enjoyed discovering these forgotten authors as much as I did.

See you all at Loncon3!
Tags:

(Leave a comment)

March 25th, 2014


memphismaniac
07:35 pm - Myrtle Douglas (Morojo) - Best Fan Writer
Myrtle Douglas (commonly known as Morojo) began editing the fanzine Novacious (with Forrest J. Ackerman) in December, 1938. Based on the rules of eligibility for Best Fanzine, Novacious is not eligible in that category, but any writings within the first issue would make the writer eligible for Best Fan Writer. Myrtle Douglas also edited Imagination! with Forrest J. Ackerman and T. Bruce Yerke.

(Leave a comment)

> previous 10 entries
> Go to Top
LiveJournal.com